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  • Your Ideal Who Breakfast

    I've already posted about Roger's favourite breakfast recipe on the other thread, so I am starting with Pete's breakfast. (starts at around 3:13)

    (Sorry, for some reason, I've been struggling with embedding the video in this post.)

    [video=youtube;xPERuyKEq98]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xPERuyKEq98[/video]

    My thoughts when I watched this for the first time... Oh, Pete, please use a pin to prevent eggs from exploding in the microwave! What! he uses a chainsaw to slice a loaf of bread?? Oh, he doesn't peel the skin of the oranges...


    Folks, what's your ideal breakfast based on your Who love?
    Last edited by kallan; 07-31-2021, 10:52 AM.


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  • #2
    I studied in the UK for a semester and bunked with two British girls for a while until I found my own place. One morning they asked if I wanted baked beans on toast and I was stunned. At home, we would sometimes have baked beans but as a side dish, with dinner or something. It sounded crazy to put beans on toast. But I am always willing to try anything and it was oddly delicious! A calorie bomb though!
    Living with them, I also found out that the British (maybe not all of them!) have 5 meals a day, instead of 3. There’s also ‘elevenses’ and, of course, the late night snack which could be quite elaborate (again, beans on toast!)

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    • #3
      [QUOTE=therealblonde]Living with them, I also found out that the British (maybe not all of them!) have 5 meals a day, instead of 3. There’s also ‘elevenses’ and, of course, the late night snack which could be quite elaborate (again, beans on toast!) [/QUOTE]


      I don't think it's the norm for we Brits to have 5 meals a day - generally it's breakfast, lunch and dinner (or, if you're working class like me, breakfast, dinner and tea!). Some Brits do snack on things like cakes and biscuits (cookies) between meals, so maybe that's where the '5 meals' notion comes from.



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      • #4
        I learnt English from Callan Method that is invented by an Italian. That's why my username is kallan. When I registered, I tried to use 'callan' because there's my textbook next to me, but it was already taken. So I changed the c to k because they are exactly the same sound to pronounce in my language. Anyway, the textbooks were written by the Italian teacher, so they were a bit outdated and there was a little confusion about British cultures. So probably it might be incorrect, but British people normally take 3 meals in a day with 2 tea times, according to the textbook. Especially for working-class people, the calories in the tea are important. Maybe Richard knows if it's true or not.

        Oh, dear. I didn't know that Beans on Toast is such a high-calorie meal and I've already eaten up four cans of Heinz Baked Beans (not Who special ones), and I added a poached egg every time, following Roger's recipe!

        What is the traditional breakfast in the Netherlands? When I stayed in Amsterdam, it was a typical American breakfast


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        • #5
          [QUOTE=kallan;n163825]
          Oh, dear. I didn't know that Beans on Toast is such a high-calorie meal and I've already eaten up four cans of Heinz Baked Beans (not Who special ones), and I added a poached egg every time, following Roger's recipe! [/QUOTE]


          Don't worry too much, Rie - baked beans are high in fibre and good for you! I have beans on toast a couple of times a week, on wholemeal toasted bread, for my mid-day meal (although I opt for a reduced-sugar and salt type); in fact that's part of a high-fibre diet my doctor recommended many years ago.


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          • #6
            Is there something wrong with the site, by the way? When I quote people's texts, it keeps including the code.

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            • #7
              Fried eggs, first thing in the morning... ;)
              One Note

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              • #8
                [QUOTE=windupman;n163864]Fried eggs, first thing in the morning... ;)[/QUOTE]


                I really like 'em now, but when I was a kid, my old man used to leave for work at 7am in the morning and, every school day before he went, he'd cook me a fried egg on toast. By the time I got downstairs, the toast was stone cold, the butter congealed and the egg hard and rubbery. Every day, I'd bin it (and I dared not complain) and go without breakfast. I just wanted cereal, but he'd never buy any, and as he refused to have a fridge in the house, the milk was off within a day, especially in summer. So I really identified with "my fried egg makes me sick first thing in the morning"!

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                • #9
                  My dad used to cook "vinegar eggs" in the morning--basically a poached egg with vinegar added to the water they're poached in, I have no idea why. I seem to recall him saying it helped the egg hold together better, but have my doubts about that. I could smell it the minute I woke up--oh god, not vinegar eggs again! :D But at least they were still hot, and the toast was fresh. I hated the white part of the egg, could only choke it down with a lot of salt, but that runny yolk soaked into the toast--that was just fine. Then he'd drop me off at school on his way to work and we'd get to talk along the way, so that was good too. Could put up with a little vinegar for that. :cool:
                  "Maybe there is no sublime; only the shining of the amnion's tatters." --Galway Kinnell

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                  • #10
                    [QUOTE=suzanity;n163887]My dad used to cook "vinegar eggs" in the morning--basically a poached egg with vinegar added to the water they're poached in, I have no idea why. I seem to recall him saying it helped the egg hold together better, but have my doubts about that. I could smell it the minute I woke up--oh god, not vinegar eggs again! :D But at least they were still hot, and the toast was fresh. I hated the white part of the egg, could only choke it down with a lot of salt, but that runny yolk soaked into the toast--that was just fine. Then he'd drop me off at school on his way to work and we'd get to talk along the way, so that was good too. Could put up with a little vinegar for that. :cool:[/QUOTE]

                    Your dad was right, Suzanity. A dash of white vinegar holds the egg white together but don't use a lot. Better still, ditch the vinegar and bring the water to a rolling boil then give it a whisk with a, er, whisk and then slowly drop the egg in and it'll poach beautifully.
                    Richard Evans
                    Editor & Web Master thewho.com

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                    • #11
                      [QUOTE=a11who;n163827]
                      Don't worry too much, Rie - baked beans are high in fibre and good for you! I have beans on toast a couple of times a week, on wholemeal toasted bread, for my mid-day meal (although I opt for a reduced-sugar and salt type); in fact that's part of a high-fibre diet my doctor recommended many years ago.
                      [/QUOTE]

                      A high-fibre diet! Glad to hear that, because there are still two cans left in the kitchen!


                      [QUOTE=a11who;n163869]
                      I really like 'em now, but when I was a kid, my old man used to leave for work at 7am in the morning and, every school day before he went, he'd cook me a fried egg on toast. By the time I got downstairs, the toast was stone cold, the butter congealed and the egg hard and rubbery. Every day, I'd bin it (and I dared not complain) and go without breakfast. I just wanted cereal, but he'd never buy any, and as he refused to have a fridge in the house, the milk was off within a day, especially in summer. So I really identified with "my fried egg makes me sick first thing in the morning"! [/QUOTE]

                      That's a very interesting story, Gary. I can paint a picture of young you binning it as a part of the daily routine in my head, haha!



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                      • #12
                        [QUOTE=a11who;n163828]Is there something wrong with the site, by the way? When I quote people's texts, it keeps including the code.

                        [/QUOTE]

                        Yes, there have been some sort of glitches with coding apparently.


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                        • #13
                          [QUOTE=suzanity;n163887]My dad used to cook "vinegar eggs" in the morning--basically a poached egg with vinegar added to the water they're poached in, I have no idea why. I seem to recall him saying it helped the egg hold together better, but have my doubts about that. I could smell it the minute I woke up--oh god, not vinegar eggs again! :D But at least they were still hot, and the toast was fresh. I hated the white part of the egg, could only choke it down with a lot of salt, but that runny yolk soaked into the toast--that was just fine. Then he'd drop me off at school on his way to work and we'd get to talk along the way, so that was good too. Could put up with a little vinegar for that. :cool:[/QUOTE]

                          Yes, like Richard said, I also use vinegar for a poached egg, but I prefer a super soft boiled egg in Japanese style since it's easier to cook.


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                          • #14
                            Another good way for beans Rie is to add a teaspoon sized amount per half can of Heinz ketchup or similar .

                            Cook on a high heat stirring until the beans start to split , highly recommended!

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                            • #15
                              [QUOTE=maxrnb;n163900]

                              Your dad was right, Suzanity. A dash of white vinegar holds the egg white together but don't use a lot. Better still, ditch the vinegar and bring the water to a rolling boil then give it a whisk with a, er, whisk and then slowly drop the egg in and it'll poach beautifully.[/QUOTE]


                              [QUOTE=kallan;n163907]

                              Yes, like Richard said, I also use vinegar for a poached egg, but I prefer a super soft boiled egg in Japanese style since it's easier to cook. [/QUOTE]




                              Thanks, yall! If he were still around, I'd say something--I think he probably used way too much vinegar, but he'd be glad to know he was right. :)

                              As is, I don't especially like poached, fried, or soft-boiled eggs, and absolutely cannot stand hard-boiled ones, even deviled. Very bad, very gross experience later in childhood, which I won't go into. Used to not even be able to be in the same room with hard-boiled eggs--the smell...Better now, I can tolerate the smell, and have even eaten some very small pieces mixed up in a salad, though it took conscious effort. I love scrambled eggs, though, and have recently discovered the yumminess of shakshuka.
                              "Maybe there is no sublime; only the shining of the amnion's tatters." --Galway Kinnell

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