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  • #31
    [QUOTE=suzanity;n163977]

    That's taking "be lucky" to a whole new level--glad to hear it, and so glad you're still here.

    Fusion cuisines are wonderful. Here's a quick overview on the New Orleans version: [url]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuisine_of_New_Orleans[/url]
    Just Wikipedia, but it all sounds about right. My mom considered herself Creole, though how you'd prove it I don't know. Used to really look forward to the times she made jambalaya.




    Were the onions cooked?

    And while I love me some bacon grease, don't know if I'd take it that far. I usually use it to season things, like Brunswick Stew, in cornbread batter, and to fry green tomatoes. Frying other things I mostly use olive oil, or melted Crisco if I need a whole lot, but somehow green tomatoes just need that smoky richness. I've actually been known to buy bacon just to get the grease out of it, then have to ask myself, hmmmm, now how to I use this bacon? :D

    [/QUOTE]

    The onions were raw...:eek:
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    • #32
      [QUOTE=windupman;n163956]

      No bacon, just the rendered fat. Cooled fat, looked like butter. :/[/QUOTE]

      I had to google it. Sounds healthier than batter. I may have to look for it in a Chinese town nearby my house. Thanks!


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      • #33
        [QUOTE=a11who;n163953]


        Long Live Rie! :)



        [/QUOTE]

        ...So you need me every night?? (No serious meaning! Just wanted to quote the lyrics!)


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        • #34
          [QUOTE=suzanity;n163977]

          That's taking "be lucky" to a whole new level--glad to hear it, and so glad you're still here.

          Fusion cuisines are wonderful. Here's a quick overview on the New Orleans version: [url]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuisine_of_New_Orleans[/url]
          Just Wikipedia, but it all sounds about right. My mom considered herself Creole, though how you'd prove it I don't know. Used to really look forward to the times she made jambalaya.

          [/QUOTE]

          Thank you, suzanity!

          Did your mother speak the Creole language, as well? I always to be fascinated by hearing language evolutions.
          Visiting New Orleans (hopefully to see The Who) and eat Jambalaya, gumbo, and crawfish etouffee there is now my wishing list!



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          • #35
            [QUOTE=kallan;n163993]

            ...So you need me every night?? (No serious meaning! Just wanted to quote the lyrics!)[/QUOTE]


            Well, as we're in different time zones and I love to see your posts during the daytime here, I guess so! ;)



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            • #36
              [QUOTE=kallan;n163994]

              Thank you, suzanity!

              Did your mother speak the Creole language, as well? I always to be fascinated by hearing language evolutions.
              Visiting New Orleans (hopefully to see The Who) and eat Jambalaya, gumbo, and crawfish etouffee there is now my wishing list!

              [/QUOTE]

              It's a little confusing, but Creole from New Orleans and the Creole language are two different things. The Creoles, in New Orleans, are a group of people descended from the original colonizers of the area.

              As far as language, there's the category of creole languages--basically new languages that grew from a fusion of other languages in zones of colonization--and then there's a specific creole language known simply as Creole, which is spoken mostly in Haiti.

              My mother was of mostly Spanish, French, and Italian descent, and spoke English with a distinct New Orleans accent, which softened over the years of living in Alabama. She may have known a little French picked up from older relatives, but didn't claim to speak it.

              Let me know when you're headed to New Orleans, I'll try and meet you there! Crawfish etouffee is wonderful stuff. :)
              "Maybe there is no sublime; only the shining of the amnion's tatters." --Galway Kinnell

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              • #37
                [QUOTE=windupman;n163991]

                The onions were raw...:eek:[/QUOTE]

                Way too much for me. But I might try a little bacon grease on toast sometime. You may have started something here... :D
                "Maybe there is no sublime; only the shining of the amnion's tatters." --Galway Kinnell

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                • #38
                  My Dad used to eat bread and rendered, cold fat from either bacon or, when we occasionally had it, beef. It was quite a common thing to eat in the UK back in the day - it's known as 'bread and dripping'. I only had it a couple of times and I didn't enjoy it.


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                  • #39
                    [QUOTE=suzanity;n164010]

                    It's a little confusing, but Creole from New Orleans and the Creole language are two different things. The Creoles, in New Orleans, are a group of people descended from the original colonizers of the area.

                    As far as language, there's the category of creole languages--basically new languages that grew from a fusion of other languages in zones of colonization--and then there's a specific creole language known simply as Creole, which is spoken mostly in Haiti.

                    My mother was of mostly Spanish, French, and Italian descent, and spoke English with a distinct New Orleans accent, which softened over the years of living in Alabama. She may have known a little French picked up from older relatives, but didn't claim to speak it.

                    Let me know when you're headed to New Orleans, I'll try and meet you there! Crawfish etouffee is wonderful stuff. :)[/QUOTE]

                    Oh, there is always something new to learn!

                    Yes, it'd be super nice to see you in person! My daughter always jokes about my strong Japanese accent, "You need to install a chatting app before meet your cyber friends!" The biggest problem is most Japanese citizens haven't been vaccinated yet and haven't been allowed to visit the United States yet.
                    I really hope that everything gets back to normal soon!


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                    • #40
                      [QUOTE=a11who;n164016]My Dad used to eat bread and rendered, cold fat from either bacon or, when we occasionally had it, beef. It was quite a common thing to eat in the UK back in the day - it's known as 'bread and dripping'. I only had it a couple of times and I didn't enjoy it.


                      [/QUOTE]

                      Googled 'bread and dripping'. Still don't know what's the difference between Lard and rendered fat, but it's always great to know something new!


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                      • #41
                        [QUOTE=a11who;n164016]My Dad used to eat bread and rendered, cold fat from either bacon or, when we occasionally had it, beef. It was quite a common thing to eat in the UK back in the day - it's known as 'bread and dripping'. I only had it a couple of times and I didn't enjoy it.


                        [/QUOTE]

                        According to my mom, my maternal great grandfather owned a butcher shop, he had some really odd breakfast habits, to include eating pickled pigs feet for breakfast on occasion. He was of German descent, his store operated from 1916 - 1966. I remember him always smiling and his whiskers scratching my face when he gave a hug. Food and memories go together, like, bread and butter..
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                        • #42
                          [QUOTE=kallan;n164021]

                          Googled 'bread and dripping'. Still don't know what's the difference between Lard and rendered fat, but it's always great to know something new![/QUOTE]


                          Lard is rendered pig fat, Rie, and in fact I found eating bread and dripping as unappetising as eating bread and lard!


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                          • #43
                            [QUOTE=windupman;n164039]

                            According to my mom, my maternal great grandfather owned a butcher shop, he had some really odd breakfast habits, to include eating pickled pigs feet for breakfast on occasion. He was of German descent, his store operated from 1916 - 1966. I remember him always smiling and his whiskers scratching my face when he gave a hug. Food and memories go together, like, bread and butter..[/QUOTE]


                            My gran (father's mum) used to eat chitterlings - she called them 'chitlins' - which are pig intestines. And my grandad, who fought in the first world war, wouldn't eat cheese until it had gone mouldy! Don't know if it was to do with his time in the trenches, or just his preference. Like you say, Danny, food is a real link to memories (I think they call it 'Proustian' after the French chap Proust who found his memories triggered by eating madeleine cakes).


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                            • #44
                              Okay, if I start quoting I'll be here all day, so I'll just chime back in with some general replies.

                              Rie, I'm willing to wait. I think it will take a few years, and normal won't ever be quite what we were used to up until covid, but I doubt New Orleans is going anywhere--if it's still here after Katrina, I'm convinced it can get through anything: as the sea levels rise the city will learn to float, beignets, etouffee and all. Meanwhile you're already beating the odds minute by minute, and me? Well...maybe I'm just too crazy to kill. For the time being. So, I'll see you in NOLA when the tides are right. Deal?

                              Learn something new every day--I didn't realize that lard was specifically pork fat. I did know that tallow is rendered beef fat. Both are bland and best used as ingredients, IMO. But bacon grease...maybe it's the difference between American bacon, especially if it's been smoked, and other forms (Canadian, English.) There's enough flavor in the rendered fat that I'd be willing to try it. Will let yall know how it goes.

                              Chitlins! Oh my god! Yall DO cook soul food in the UK! Who knew? :D :D :D

                              Although personally I've never been brave enough to eat them. Nor hog maws. nor pigs feet, pickled or otherwise, though they're sold in grocery stores around here, especially at New Year's, for the beans and greens. You're supposed to cook the beans with pig parts: hog jowl, maws, or feet--but I just use the bones from a pork chop or two. Because, I'll actually eat pork chops! :D
                              "Maybe there is no sublime; only the shining of the amnion's tatters." --Galway Kinnell

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                              • #45
                                [QUOTE=suzanity;n164048]You're supposed to cook the beans with pig parts...[/QUOTE]


                                I read this as 'you're supposed to cook the beans with [B]pig farts[/B]'! I know there's an expression 'the only part of a pig you can't eat is the squeal', but cooking the beans with emissions from the other end would take some doing! :D




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